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News > A helping hand when moving on

 

A helping hand when moving on

Posted on February 8th 2013 - 10:37

 

Guest post by Simon North, Founder of Careers Specialists Position Ignition and the Career Ignition Club

There’s something ironic about the life journey that we take from child to young adult, to working adult to the post-work stage. The first 20 years or so of this journey is all planned out for us; with parents and community authorities giving us more than a helping hand as we move on from pre-school to school and then to college. We arrive into our family and embark on our education and this establishes us on a set path. But then, at some point in our early adulthood, we make a huge transition and set out on our own. From then on we are more or less on our own compared to our early life and it’s up to us to be accountable for our lives and take control of them by choosing when to move on from each life stage—be it moving on from a job, a relationship, a community. 


The reality is that it is tough to create our own life plans – paradoxically, even more so as we get older.  In our latter years we need a helping hand sometimes nearly as much as we do in our earlier years. Just as we go through many life transitions when we’re young, our middle-aged years also see a lot of changes in our life, from our children flying the nest, to grand parenting, to retiring from full-time work.

As author Daniel Pink says in his book Drive, some people have achieved mastery in their work. Mastery is that stage where you’ve served your apprenticeship by working hard and gritting it out towards our long-term goals and have now reached a significant level of skill and experience. And it’s this situation that any economic worker wants to achieve. 

When we want to think about moving on; with our partner, our family, our careers or whatever it may be, having mastery is crucial. It is critical bedrock on which so many other elements link into. Our lives come as a package and the issue of work is right there in the middle of other aspects of life - such as our community and our finances.

Whatever we’re looking to move on from and wherever we’re looking to move on to, we must consider all the elements of our life and not just the area where the point of transition is. By looking at the process of change in this way, we find that we can get a helping hand from those in other areas of our life. Our friends, families, communities, tribes and networks can all help us to move on. This was true in our youth and may even be truer now, as we’ll naturally have had more and more people in our lives as the years have rolled by and we’ve moved on several times already.

About the author

Simon North is Founder of Position Ignition, the UK's leading Career Change Company and co-author of their eBook 135 Networking Tips. Get more career advice from their Career Advice Blog or follow them on Twitter: @PosIgnition 

 

 

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